La Presse: Turban: la Fédération québécoise de soccer défend sa position

La Fédération québécoise de soccer (FQS) a choisi de bannir le turban des terrains de soccer de la province pour des raisons de sécurité, mais elle ignore si ce type de couvre-chef est réellement dangereux.

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La Presse: Pas de turban sur les terrains de soccer québécois

Montréal) L'Organisation mondiale des sikhs du Canada (OMSC) songe à poursuivre la Fédération québécoise de soccer (FQS), qui a reconduit samedi l'interdiction visant le port du turban sur les terrains de soccer de la province, une situation unique au Canada.

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Ottawa Citizen: Quebec soccer association upholds ban on turbans despite Canada-wide directive

Balpreet Singh, a spokesman for the World Sikh Organization of Canada, said Quebec is the only province where Sikh soccer players have faced problems because they wear a turban.

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Montreal Gazette: Turban question comes to a head at weekend soccer assembly

The ruling affects between 100 to 200 young boys who live in LaSalle, Dollard, Pierrefonds and some off-island communities, said Mukhbir Singh, vice president of the World Sikh Organization of Canada.

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Vancouver Sun: Religion in Canada, a breakdown

Sikhs British Columbia and Ontario are the top two provinces, respectively, for the country’s approximately 455,000 Sikhs. Just over three-quarters of B.C.’s population, or almost 156,000, lived in Vancouver. But the population is growing elsewhere, says the Canadian chapter of the World Sikh Organization. The economic boom in Saskatchewan and Alberta has drawn Sikhs with the need to find a balance between a Sikh keeping his beard and turban and requirements to wear safety equipment such as gas masks. “I gauge where the growing pains are by the number of calls I get,” said Balpreet Singh Boparai, the organization’s legal counsel.

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CBC: Turbans banned on Quebec soccer fields

Balpreet Singh, legal counsel for the the World Sikh Organization for Canada, said young Sikhs in Quebec are being unfairly punished.

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Montreal Gazette: Quebec won’t allow turbans in soccer despite ruling from Canadian body

“I am worried that a whole generation of Sikhs living in Quebec will not be allowed to play soccer because of religious beliefs,” said Singh, the Quebec vice-president of the World Sikh Organization of Canada.

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Globe and Mail: Small ceremonial swords to be allowed in B.C. courthouses

“This decision is incredibly important to us,” said Sukhvinder Vinning, executive director of the World Sikh Organization of Canada. “As law-abiding citizens, we go to the courthouse to fulfill our civic duties. But in order to fill that duty, we have to compromise our Sikh code of conduct by leaving our kirpan behind.

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The Province: Sikhs hail kirpan agreement for B.C. courts

“It’s a relief,” said Sukhvinder Kaur Vinning, executive director of the World Sikh Organization of Canada. “I can focus on being a good civic citizen and I don’t have to worry about compromising my faith, so that’s a huge burden that’s been lifted.” Having to testify in court can be a stressful situation, and for Sikhs having to remove the kirpan made it worse, said Vinning. “To take it off, that’s a painful thing to ask,” she said. “It eats away at a person.” “[It was like] kind of being torn in two ... practicing Sikhism and being a good citizen.” The kirpan, as part of the Sikh code of conduct, is supposed to be worn — sheathed — at all times. The kirpan itself symbolizes the Sikh duty to stand against injustice. “It’s very sacred, it’s an extension of who we are — we wear it all times,” said Vinning. “Taking it off – it’s hard.” So the government and WSO worked together to create the new policy.

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News 1130: Khalsa Sikhs allowed to carry kirpans in BC courtrooms

Prem Vinning with the World Sikh Organization is happy with the move and called it an open dialogue with the province. “There is a training video that has been created by the WSO with the BC Sheriff’s Office so that people can be trained in the courthouses.”

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